What Johnson Asiedu Nketiah, the Witness of the Petitioner, will be saying in court.

    3

    The Petitioner has caused to be filed on his behalf two witness statements. The Witness Statement is basically the evidence in chief of a party once same is presented to on oath and admitted in evidence by the court. It captures the whole testimony that a witness would have said in court when given the chance to state his case. One of the Witness Statement filed by the Petitioner is that of Johnson Asiedu Nketiah.

    In his witness statement, Johnson Asiedu Nketiah highlights the events surrounding the declaration of the election results by Mrs. Jean Mensa and the inconsistencies in the figures. This includes most significantly the error in figures and percentages announced and the total percentage votes of all the presidential candidates summing up to 100.3% which is mathematically and statistically impossible. He asserts that the declaration of the election results is in flagrant violation of the 1992 constitution. He further insists that based on the election results declared, there should have been a run-off between Nana Addo Danquah Akufo Addo and John Dramani Mahama. He also alleged that there was vote padding by certain officials in favour of the NPP and that numbers were manufactured which were totally unrelated to the actual votes cast at the polling station and he thus accused Mrs. Jean Mensa of bias in favour of Nana Addo.

    In support of his averments, he attached the following as evidence:

    Exhibit A– Video and audio recording of the so-called declaration.

    Exhibit B– Unsigned press release containing figures of total valid votes cast.

    Exhibit C– Sample details of wrong aggregation of valid votes

    Exhibit D– Letter written by NDC to the 1st respondent

    Exhibit E– Spreadsheet of results released by the 1st respondent on its website

    Exhibit F– Spreadsheets showing vote padding from 26 constituencies

    Exhibit G– Clip of interview of Mr Mac Manu claiming the petitioner also benefited from vote padding. 

    Exhibit H– A copy of C.I. 135